Tutorial One

Adding a long window to our sample garden room model

In this tutorial, I am going to show you how you could modify the sample garden room models which come with the 3in1 Sample Plans.

What we are aiming to achieve

It is popular to incorporate long, fixed glazed windows into a garden room design. These can be positioned anywhere within the room, but are typically placed near the doors to create a wrap-around area of glazing.

This picture shows you our sample garden room with the addition of a long window on the left-hand side. You could use the techniques we will show you to add your window to the position that works for you.

Garden room tutorial one

Opening the model

Once you have the downloaded the model, it would be a good idea to make a copy of it and save it with another name.

You need a copy of SketchUp to follow our demonstration. We are using the professional version, but you can follow the steps we show you in the free version which you can download here.

Make sure you are running the 2018 version to open these models.

Once you have the model open in SketchUp, you need to make sure you have the Scenes Panel open. To do this click Window > Default Tray > Scenes it should have a tick by it.

The Scenes Panel will then be open, and this will allow you to easily navigate through our layered model.

Take a look at our screen:

Modifying the side wall frame

Our first step is to select the side wall framework. To do this select the scene C-Side Wall Framework. This will give us a 3D view of the two side wall frames.

If following along using the free wall frame model we mentioned, open that file now.

Because these are solid walls at the moment we have used the same frame for both side walls. Because we are placing a window in just one wall, we need to make the frames unique.

To do this select the left-hand frame and Right-Click and select Make Unique.

Then change the Scene to C- Side Wall Framework Plan.

Take a look at our screen:

Edit the wall frame component

The side wall frames are a SketchUp Component. Making elements components allows you to reuse them throughout your model.

Because we have made our wall unique, our changes won't affect the other side wall.

To allow us to make changes to this frame we need to edit the component. To do this select the frame, it will go blue. Right-Click and select Edit Component.

You will now see a dotted box around the frame, this is the editable boundary.

We now need to make the components of this frame that we are going to edit unique so that they won't affect other parts of our model where the part has been used.

Select the first two noggins (working from the right) and studs two and three. As you select each one, it will go blue, then Right-Click and select the Make Unique option.

Take a look at our screen:

Position the first stud

Now that we have done these preliminary steps, let's start making changes!

You need to ensure you have the Guide Lines switched on. To do this click View >  Guides and there should be a tick beside it.

Next, move the two noggins to one side, we will cut them down later.

Draw a guideline 100mm in from the outer stud. Then take stud 2 and using the Move Tool, move it so that it snaps next to our guideline. The mitred top butting into our top plate.

You will quickly see that the stud is too short for this position. To lengthen it, click it, it will go blue. Then Right-Click and select Edit Component.

Next using the Orbit Tool move the model on your screen so that you have a good view of the bottom of the stud. Then, using the Push/Pull Tool hover over the bottom of the stud, it will show blue dots. Then pull this down so that it meets the bottom plate.

Take a look at this on our screen:

 

Shorten the first noggin

Now that our stud is in position, we need to position a noggin to connect it with the outer stud.

You could model a new noggin, but for ease lets just make this one smaller. Select the noggin and move it into position. Once you are happy, click it and it will go blue. Right-click and click Edit Component.

Select the Push/Pull Tool and hover over the end of the noggin, the surface will turn to blue dots. Push the noggin end into the inner edge of the outer noggin. If you move your mouse slightly up the edge of the stud, the noggin edge should snap to this edge for a perfect fit.

Take a look at our screen:

Positioning the second stud

Now we need to position our second stud. First, mark a guideline 600mm from our first stud. This is the width of our window.

Now copy our second stud. The easiest way to do this is to select the Move Tool and hold the CTRL key as you move the stud. Pull the stud along so that it meets the guideline.

We will need to extend the length of this stud like we did earlier.

Delete the guidelines using the Eraser Tool.

Take a look at our screen:

Position and shorten the noggin

Draw a guideline at the bottom of our row of noggins. Then select our noggin and move it into the position. It should snap to the guideline.

Shorten the noggin using the process described earlier.

Delete the guideline using the Eraser Tool.

Take a look at our screen:

Cut the bottom plate

These long windows sit on the floor frame deck so as you get that floor to ceiling look.

We, therefore, need to edit the bottom plate. To do this select the bottom plate, it will go blue. Right-Click > Make Unique. Then Right-Click again > Edit Component.

Select the outer edge of the plate and push it back to the edge of our second stud.

We now need to make a small plate to go under our outer studs. To do this, select the Shapes Tool - it should be set to a Rectangle. Make a Rectangle on the bottom of the outer stud. Using the Push/Pull Tool pull it down 45mm - you can slide your mouse to pull it to the depth of the main plate.

Then using the Push/Pull tool, pull the plate so that it ends flush with the inner stud.

Take a look at our screen.

Creating the window lintel

Using the Tape Tool, measure up from the bottom plate 2000mm to create a guideline. Again, using the Tape Tool measure from the guideline up to the top plate at each end of the opening. It should be 64mm on the left and 117mm on the right.

Then move down to the bottom of the frame, still working within our editable frame. Using the Tape Tool make a guidelines parallel to the bottom plate.  Then make a second guideline 45mm from the first.

Then create guidelines at 90 degrees to these lines 600mm apart.

Select the Shape Tool, it should be set to a Rectangle and draw a rectangle within the guides we have just drawn.

Take the Push/Pull Tool and hover over the rectangle is should fill with blue spots. Pull the rectangle upwards typing 117mm as you do.

Next, make a guide 64mm up from the bottom of this block. Then take the Pencil Tool and draw a line from the guideline on the left up to the top of the block on the right.

Use the Push/Pull Tool to push away the top left-hand section.

Erase all the guidelines.

Using the Orbit Tool move the model so you have a clear view above it. Use the Pointer Tool to create a boundary around our shaped lintel. It should go blue with dots. Right-Click and select Make Component then give the component a name and click Create.

Take a look at our screen:

 

 

Position the lintel

Now, select the Move Tool and move our lintel into position, flush with the angled top plate and the two studs we have positioned.

Using the Orbit Tool move the model around so that you can see the rear side of the frame.

With the lintel selected and blue, select the Move Tool again and holding down the CTRL key pull the lintel towards the rear edge of the frame. This will make a copy of our lintel. Position this so that it is flush with the studs and top plate.

Select the Eraser Tool and erase the guideline before clicking white space outside our edit area. This will Close the Component.

Take a look at our screen:

Add our new parts to the layer

To keep our model tidy, we need to add the new elements of the frame to their correct layer. In this case, Side Wall Framework.

To do this make sure you have the Entity Info Panel and the Layers Panel open. If they are not open, select Window > Default Tray > and ensure there is a tick beside Entity Info & Layer.

In the Layers Panel, turn off the Side Wall Framework layer by deselecting the tick box. The main frame will disappear leaving just the lintels and the small bottom plate.

Use the Pointer to select these elements. Once selected move to the Entity Info Panel and in the drop-down select Side Wall Framework.

Now back to the Layers Panel, select and deselect the tick box and our complete wall frame will switch on and off.

Take a look at our screen:

Let's see what our frame looks like

Before we move on and see what our frame looks like, we need to update the scene.

Move over to the Scenes Panel and select the Refresh Icon in the top left-hand corner.

A Warning Box will appear. Select Save As New Style and click Update Scene.

Now lets select scene C-Side Wall Framework to see how our model is looking.

Using the Orbit Tool you can move the model around to see the changes. You will see we now have the opening for our new window, but our other wall remains as it was - this is because we made the wall we were editing unique earlier on.

Take a look at our screen:

The changes we've made have been reflected throughout the model

If you flick through the framework scenes you will see that the changes we have made have been reflected throughout the model. Click C-Roof Frame Overview for instance and you will see our complete timber frame with our new window opening.

Take a look at our screen:

Adjusting the insulation

Now that we have our framework for the window, we need to modify the other layers of our model to reflect these changes. There are various steps in doing this, but in doing so you are ensuring that you can use the model for dimension reference throughout your project. Especially when it comes to quantifying the materials you will need.

The first layer to alter is the insulation.

If we click through to Scene C-Wall Insulation 3D you will see that the insulation is covering our new window opening. We need to correct this.

Take a moment to jot down some measurements here. We want to know the spacing between the outer stud and the one framing our window - it's 55mm. We want to then measure the space on the other side of the frame - it's 132mm.

Let's now move to Scene C-Side Wall Insulation Detail. You will now find the rigid insulation isolated from the framework.

Now, this layout is being used for both side walls at the moment. So, we need to make this unique. With the Pointer Tool click the insulation it will go blue, then Right-Click and select Make Unique. This will isolate our changes from the other side wall.

With the insulation section selected and blue, Right-Click and select Edit Component. Like before we will then have an editable area.

Then draw some guidelines using the measurements we jotted down earlier - 55mm on the right and 132mm on the left.

Selecting the two top panels and bottom two panels on the right, make each one unique by Right-Click > Make Unique. Then make each panel editable by Right-Click > Edit Component.

Using the Pencil Tool to create a line along our guide. The Pencil Tool should snap to the guideline.

Then use the Push/Pull Tool to push away the sections we don't require.

When you have completed all four panels, use the Eraser Tool to delete the guidelines and then close the editable component.

Before we move on, let's update our scene. Use the refresh button at the top left of the Scenes Panel and click Update.

Take a look at our screen:

 

Let's explore the insulation changes

Now that we have cut the insulation to fit our modified framework, let's see how the changes look as part of our overall insulation build-up.

Let's go back to Scene C-Wall Insulation 3D. If you use the Obit Tool to look at the model you will see that the insulation now sits perfectly around our new window opening, but our changes haven't affected the other side wall.

Take a look at our screen:

Shaping the sheathing

The timber sheathing helps to strengthen our framework. At the moment though, it is covering up our new opening.

We are going to show you a slightly different technique here for creating the opening.

Select the Scene D-Wall Sheathing from the Scenes Panel. Using the Orbit Tool you will see that the sheathing is used on the outside of the frame all around our building.

The same sheathing components have been used for both side walls, so like before we need to make these unique.

Select the left-hand wall and Right-Click > Make Unique. Then, Right-Click > Edit Component.

Select the right-hand panel that is covering our window opening. Right-Click > Make Unique. Then Right-Click > Edit Component.

Now take the Shape Tool (check that its set to Rectangle) and draw a smallish rectangle in the area where we know our opening is. Use the Push/Pull Tool to push away this section. You will be able to see the inner framework through this hole.

Then using a mix of the Orbit Tool and the Push/Pull Tool push the edges of the hole back so that they meet with the edge of our opening.

Once you have done this, close the editable area.

Update the Scene by clicking the refresh icon in the top left corner of the Scenes Panel > Update.

Take a look at our screen:

Trimming the breather membrane

The next layer we need to alter is the breather membrane. This is a very thin fabric that wraps around the outside of our building.

Start by selecting E-Breather Membrane from the Scenes Panel.

Because this layer is thin, it can be difficult to select. If you look through the door opening to our window opening and select it that way, it should be easiest.

Once you have selected the breather membrane Right-Click > Edit Component. Then selecting the wall we want to edit Right-Click > Make Unique and then Right-Click > Edit Component.

Because this material is thin you will be able to see the outline of our opening. Take the Shape Tool Rectangle and make a smallish rectangle on the breather membrane. Then using the Push/Pull Tool push away the rectangle, this will allow you to see into our room.

Again, using the Push/Pull Tool push the edges of the breather membrane back to the edges of our opening.

Once you have done this close the component to lock in our changes. If you Orbit around the model, you will see the changes have not affected the other side.

Update the Scene by clicking the refresh icon > Update.

Take a look at our screen:

Trimming the cladding batten around the opening

If you select Scene G-Cladding Battens you will quickly see that the cladding battens are crossing over our opening, they need trimming.

To start, select the cladding battens. Right-Click > Make Unique. Then Right-Click > Edit Component.

Then select one by one each of the battens that cross the opening. Right-Click > Make Unique then Right-Click > Edit Component. 

Using the Push/Pull Tool push the end of the batten back so that it ends flush with our opening.

If you Orbit around the model you can see that our changes have not affected the other battens, this is because we made them unique.

Take a look at our screen:

Creating small cladding battens

We now need to create some smaller battens to create the corner with the front wall. 

Right-Click > Edit Component to open the section. Then using the Tape Tool make some guidelines parallel with the bottom batten, they need to be spaced 25mm apart. Then using the front wall bottom batten as a reference create a guideline at 90 degrees. Create another 277mm away.

Using the Shape Tool Rectangle make a rectangle within these guides. Using the Push/Pull Tool pull this up to 50mm - you can type 50 on your keyboard as you pull up.

Then use the Eraser Tool to delete the guidelines. Use the Orbit Tool so you are viewing the batten from above. Use the Pointer Tool to select this new batten, then Right-Click > Make Component. Give this a name and the Save. Move over to the Entity Panel and in the Layer Dropdown select Side Wall Cladding Batten.

Next, use the Move Tool to position the batten so that it creates a 90-degree joint with the batten on the front wall.

By using the Move Tool and pressing the CTRL key at the same time you can copy and position the rest of the batten up the wall.

Close the component to lock in the changes. Then refresh the scene as we have done before.

Take at our screen:

Shaping the cladding around the window

Shaping the cladding around the opening will use many of the techniques we have already used.

Start by selecting Scene I-Side Wall Cladding. Using the Orbit Tool turn the model so that you can see through the door opening to our window opening. This will allow you to see the rear side of the cladding.

Select the cladding, it will turn blue. Right-Click > Make Unique and then Right-Click > Edit Component. Doing this will ensure our changes are only made to the cladding on this wall.

Take the Eraser Tool and delete the lines of the cladding that you can see covering the window opening.

Then move outside and delete the lines on the front of the cladding in the region of our opening.

Next, take the Shape Tool Rectangle and create a smallish rectangle where we know the opening is. Using the Push/Pull Tool push away this rectangle. You will be able to see the interior of the room.

Using the Push/Pull Tool plush the edges of the rectangle back so that they end up flush with our opening.

Close the component and update the scene as we have done previously. If you Orbit around the building you will see our changes have not affected the rest of the walls.

Take a look at our screen:

Position the window

We have made a model of the window which you can download.

Save the file to your project folder. When you are ready to insert it into the model, click File > Import > Select the file.

The window will then load in your model. It will have the blue outline. You need to turn it around 90 degrees so that it is in the same plane as our opening. To do this select the Move Tool. Hover it over the top of the window and you will see two red crosses appear. Take the right hand red cross and a protractor will appear. You can turn the window yourself or type 90 on the keyboard as you do.

Then using the Move Tool again, take the top corner and move it into the opening. The window should end up flush with the cladding.

Update your scene.

Take a look at our screen:

Moving inside:

Cut the vapour membrane

Now we can move inside. You need to start by trimming the vapour membrane. Select Scene K-Vapour Membrane to do this. You will find this layer is a cross section of our building.

Select the vapour membrane with the pointer tool and then Right-Click > Edit Component. The vapour membrane is vey thin so you will need to zoom in as we edit it.

Using the Shape Tool Rectangle draw a rectangle within our opening and the with the Push/Pull Tool to push this away. You will see from our screen it takes a bit to get the edge as the material is thin!

Zoom in, so that you can push the edges of the rectangle back to our opening.

Close the component and update the scene.

Take a look at our screen:

Trimming the plasterboard

We now need to shape the plasterboard around the opening. 

Start by selecting Scene L-Side Wall Internal Lining. Select the left-hand panel and Right-Click > Make Unique the Right-Click > Edit Component.

Then using the Shape Tool Rectangle make a rectangle in the area of our opening and then use the Push/Pull Tool to push away the rectangle. You will be able to see our window behind the plasterboard.

Use the Push/Pull Tool to make the edges flush with our opening.

Take a look at our screen:

Creating the window reveals

Next, we need to trim the window reveals. Start by measuring the depth from the window frame to the edge of the plasterboard. We make it 92mm

Then you need to use the Orbit Tool to move around to the outside of our model. The reason for this is that this is a cross-section so if we were to do the following step on the inside, we wouldn't be able to see it!

Take the Tape Tool and create a series of guidelines. You need two guides 92mm apart and then at 90-degrees create two guides 600mm apart and another two 12mm apart.

Take the Shape Tool Rectangle and create two rectangles within our guidelines. Use the Eraser Tool to delete the guidelines.

Use the Pointer Tool to select the two rectangles. In the Entity Info panel, select the Layer drop-down and select Side Wall Internal Lining.

Next, using the Push/Pull Tool pull the bigger rectangle up and type 12 as you do - this being the 12mm thickness of the plasterboard.

Use the Pointer Tool to select this rectangle and then Right-Click > Make Component. Give the component a name and then click Create. Move over to the Entity Info panel and from the Layer drop-down select Side Wall Internal Lining again.

Use the Move Tool to move this section into position at the top of our opening. It should end up flush with our plasterboard opening.

Now measure the distance from the bottom edge of this new section to the floor, we make it 1988mm.

Move back to our smaller rectangle and use the Push/Pull Tool to pull it up to 1988mm. Type 1988 on the keyboard as you do. Use the Pointer Tool to select this new section. Right-Click > Make Component and give it a name and click Create. Move over to the Entity Info panel and from the Layer drop-down select Side Wall Internal Lining.

Use the Move Tool to position the section in our window opening. Then, still using the Move Tool and holding down the CTRL key move a copy of this section to the other side of the opening.

Take a look at our screen:

Extending the flooring

We need to extend our laminate floor into our window recess. 

Start by selecting Scene M-Flooring Detail. Use the Pointer Tool to select the floor and Right-Click > Edit Component.

Now Orbit around so that you can see the edge of the floor we want to edit. 

Then, taking the Shape Tool Rectangle draw a rectangle on the edge of our floor. Take the Push/Pull Tool and pull out this rectangle to extend our floor, leaving 10mm on each side as an expansion gap.

Close the component and update the Scene.

Take a look at our screen:

Trim the skirting

If you move to Scene M-Skirting Boards you will see that the skirting is covering our opening!

Click on the skirting and then Right-Click > Edit Component. Draw a rectangle in the centre of our opening and push it away. You may find that it doesn't completely push away. Take the Eraser Tool and delete the top and bottom lines on this section.

Now push both of our cut ends pack to the edge of the opening using the Push/Pull Tool.

Take the Tape Tool and measure the distance from the edge of the skirting to the window frame. We make this 107mm.

Next, draw some guidelines using the Tape Tool. We are wanting to create the guides for a 107mm x 15mm rectangle. Next using the Shape Tool Rectangle draw a rectangle within our guides. Select the rectangle and move to the Entity Info panel and from the Layers drop-down scroll to Skirting Boards.

Then, using the Push/Pull Tool pull our rectangle up to 94mm. Remember you can type 94 on your keyboard as you pull.

Next, delete the guidelines and then select the new section of skirting. Right-Click > Make Component and give it a name. Go to the Entity Info panel and from the Layers drop-down select Skirting Boards again.

Take the Move Tool and move the skirting board into position. Then, still using the Move Tool hold down the CTRL key to copy the skirting over to the other side of the opening.

Close the component and update the scene.

Take a look at our screen:

A little tidying up

Before we finish it is worth taking a few minutes to tidy up the model. Because we have used layers and scenes, we need to go back to the scenes prior to the insertion of our new window and turn off the window layers - otherwise, it will be visible on layers we don't yet want it.

This is a little tedious, but worth it if you are using your model for reference and dimensioning.

Work through the scenes and go to the Layers Panel. Scroll down to the Layer = Long Window Frame + Long Window Glass + 600 x 2000mm Long Window and remove the ticks beside them.

Then click the refresh scene button.

Take a look at our screen:

That's it!

This is a long tutorial but hopefully, you have learnt quite a lot about editing a garden room model to 'design in' your new feature.

If you have purchased our Complete Garden Room Guide Package you can download our complete model here.